Welcome to

DAY 65

Workbook

Exercise Focus: Muscular Endurance Training

Nutrition Focus: Calorie Maintenance

Happiness Focus: Inspire

*Download your exercise list, nutrition log, & happiness workbook for today above.

exercise.

check out your hormones

The endocrine system regulates the production of hormones, which are chemicals that control cellular functions. Hormones can affect a number of different cells; however, they only influence the ones with specific receptor sites. Hormones control a number of physiological reactions in the body including energy metabolism, reproductive processes, tissue growth, hydration levels, synthesis and degradation of muscle protein, and mood. Hormones are responsible for both building new muscle and helping to burn fat, so it is important to have an understanding of which ones are released in relation to exercise as well as understanding the physiological functions they influence. Hormones can either be anabolic, which means they help build new tissue, or catabolic because they play a role in breaking tissue down. The term “anabolic steroids” is often mentioned as a method of cheating used by athletes who want to improve performance; however, anabolic steroids are actually natural chemicals produced by the body that are responsible for promoting tissue growth. 

 

Insulin: A peptide hormone produced by the pancreas, insulin regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism.

 

Glucagon: Released in response to low levels of blood sugar, glucagon is produced by the pancreas to stimulate the release of free fatty acids (FFAs) from adipose tissue and increase blood glucose levels, both of which are important for fueling exercise activity.

 

Cortisol: Cortisol is a catabolic steroid hormone produced by the adrenal gland in response to stress, low blood sugar and exercise.

 

Epinephrine & Norepinephrine: These amine hormones play an important role in helping the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) produce energy and in regulating the body’s function during cardiorespiratory exercise. 

 

Testosterone: Testosterone is a steroid hormone produced by the Leydig cells of the testes in males and the ovaries of females, with small amounts produced by the adrenal glands of both genders. 

 

Human Growth Hormone: Human growth hormone (HGH) is an anabolic peptide hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland that stimulates cellular growth.

 

Insulin-Like Growth Factor: Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) has a similar molecular structure to insulin and is stimulated by the same mechanisms that produce HGH. IGF is a peptide hormone produced in the liver and supports the function of HGH to repair protein damaged during exercise, 

 

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotransmitter that helps stimulate the production of new cells in the brain. The production of BDNF is closely related to the production of HGH and IGF—the same exercises that elevate levels of those hormones also increase amounts of BDNF. High-intensity exercise can stimulate anabolic hormones for muscle growth while elevating levels of BDNF, which can help improve cognitive function. 

 

These hormones will fluctuate in response to our exercise and nutrition.

Your Exercises For Today

nutrition.

trace minerals

Today's topic: Zinc

General Takeaway: Necessary for normal growth, immune function and wound healing.

RDA: 8 - 11 mg

Food Sources:

  • Oysters

  • Crab

  • Chickpeas

Drink 8, 8 oz of water

fill out your food log

Take your multivitamin

log your sleep hours

happiness.

inspire

“Change your thoughts and you

change your world.”

— Norman Vincent Peale